April 30, 2013

lareviewofbooks:

Howard Chaykin remembers Carmine Infantino, the postwar contraction of the comic book industry, and cultural amnesia after the baby boom. 

Though he began drawing comics in the early 1940s, it was in the ’50s that Infantino emerged from the pack of his colleagues with a singular style. Ten years earlier, one would have been hard pressed to tell the difference between Carmine Infantino, Joe Kubert, Frank Giacoia, Alex Toth, and the other teenaged boys exploited by the league of larcenous shitweasels who published comics. By the 1950s, however, these men, now in their 20s, were working in the styles and approaches that would sustain them for the rest of their respective lives and careers.

Read the whole thing here.

"At Marvel in the 1960s, Kirby produced crude, aggressive, vital, and hostile work that made DC’s books look silly and pointless by comparison." - some high praise there. The history of the comic book industry never ceases to interest me.

(Source: lareviewofbooks)

  1. cheesylazers reblogged this from geektopia
  2. geektopia reblogged this from lareviewofbooks and added:
    Excellent article. If you are a comic book fan you’ll enjoy.
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    "At Marvel in the 1960s, Kirby produced crude, aggressive, vital, and hostile work that made DC’s books look silly and...
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